The Jama Masjid, India’s largest mosque, is a testament to the rich culture of Indian Islam: 15% of practicing Indian Muslims making up a larger population than the entire Muslim population of the Middle East. Despite anti-Islamic prejudice fomented by the Indian government, Islamophobic myths as propaganda, and lingering biases regarding Indo-Pakistan conflict and Kashmiri independence, Indian Muslim culture is inextricable with Indian identity and the vast majority of Hindus and Muslims have coexisted peacefully for centuries. Indian Muslims are responsible for much of India’s university and public works culture, literary and linguistic styles, prominent devotional idiom, style of architecture, and entertainment industry.

Past Programs

The Jama Masjid, India’s largest mosque, is a testament to the rich culture of Indian Islam: 15% of practicing Indian Muslims making up a larger population than the entire Muslim population of the Middle East. Despite anti-Islamic prejudice fomented by the Indian government, Islamophobic myths as propaganda, and lingering biases regarding Indo-Pakistan conflict and Kashmiri independence, Indian Muslim culture is inextricable with Indian identity and the vast majority of Hindus and Muslims have coexisted peacefully for centuries. Indian Muslims are responsible for much of India’s university and public works culture, literary and linguistic styles, prominent devotional idiom, style of architecture, and entertainment industry.

Past Programs

Participants

Past participants in our workshop have come from many grade levels, disciplines, and levels of familiarity with the subject matter.

Some of them have included:

  • Middle school social studies teachers who address India in their units on human rights, Asian countries, and world current events
  • High school world history teachers who prepare students for the AP exams dealing with ancient civilizations, European encounters with the rest of the world, and historiography skills
  • Middle school teachers in English and Language Arts who run drama programs, reading groups, library programs, or others at their school in which they would like to expose students to more global material
  • Religious studies teachers who seek to incorporate practitioner perspectives and understanding of interfaith ideas, as well as concerning ideological agendas in religious studies, into their provided content
  • Arts, music, and dance teachers who are interested in global perspectives in their field, such as Indian music or dance forms
  • Teachers in unrelated disciplines, such as math or ESL, who wish to acquire more multicultural competencies in their classroom to deal with a growing Indian population
  • Teachers who wish to combat prejudices such as Islamophobia or anti-Sikhism in their classrooms or at their schools
  • Teachers who run extracurricular activities for which they would like a factual orientation for their interest in common practices such as meditation or yoga
  • Administrators interested in having conversations with parents or faculty about the need for global perspectives

Our Affiliations

Please, click here to learn more about "Perspectives on Teaching India for the K-12 Classroom" affiliations.

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